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First case of coronavirus reinfection identified in US: Live news | News

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  • Russia’s coronavirus cases surpassed 980,000 after the country reported 4,829 new cases in the last 24 hours.

  • The number of coronavirus cases in Latin America surpassed seven million, as legislators in Argentina’s capital passed a law allowing relatives to maintain a bedside vigil for patients dying of COVID-19.

  • South Korea extended social-distancing rules in the capital, Seoul, amid a triple-digit rise in cases, while India reported another record jump in daily cases. New Delhi has reported the world’s highest single-day caseload every day since August 7.
  • More than 24.56 million people around the world have been diagnosed with the coronavirus, and 16 million have recovered, according to Johns Hopkins University. More than 835,000 people have died.

Here are the latest updates:

Saturday, August 29

04:27 GMT – Australia’s Victoria posts lowest case rise in two months

Australia’s Victoria state recorded its lowest rise in new coronavirus cases in almost two months, but authorities warned there would be no rush to lift social distancing restrictions.

State officials on Saturday reported 94 new COVID-19 infections and 18 deaths. It was the first time new daily case numbers have fallen below 100 in eight weeks, and continues a steady trajectory downward this week.

“Every day we see the strategy working is a good day but we just need a bit more time to be able to be confident that we are, in fact, defeating this and that we can open up, gradually, steadily, safely,” Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews said at a televised news briefing.

03:52 GMT – German court gives go ahead for protest against coronavirus curbs

A court in the German capital, Berlin, upheld an earlier decision giving the go-ahead for weekend demonstrations against coronavirus restrictions, in response to an appeal by police.

The decision is final.

Authorities had announced the ban earlier this week after an event by the same organisers at the start of the month was broken up because the participants – numbering tens of thousands – were not wearing masks or keeping the required distance from one another.

03:11 GMT – Argentina reports record cases but relaxes lockdown

Argentina logged 11,717 new coronavirus cases on Friday, its highest daily jump, but the government moved ahead with its plans to ease nationwide lockdown measures.

“Today we can take a new step by authorizing meetings of up to ten people in the open air, maintaining the distance of two meters and the use of a mask. This will be in force throughout the country,” President Alberto Fernandez said in a televised address.

Restrictions related to the pandemic in the country started on March 20. The new, more relaxed rules are scheduled to last until at least September 20.

Argentina rushes to produce COVID-19 vaccine (2:40)

02:40 GMT – Colombia football league to restart in September

Colombia’s top football league will restart play in September, sports minister Ernesto Lucena said on Friday, though games will take place without spectators.

The league was suspended in March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“Today the good news for Colombia is that the third week of September at the latest we’ll have football,” Lucena said during President Ivan Duque’s nightly TV broadcast. “It will be closed door – we’ve said that from the beginning – there will not be capacity for the public.”

01:33 GMT – Researchers identify first case of reinfection in US

Researchers in Nevada reported what may be the first documented case of coronavirus reinfection in the United States, following similar reports earlier this week from Hong Kong and Europe.

A 25-year-old Reno man with mild COVID-19 symptoms initially was found to have the virus in April, recovered and tested negative twice, and then tested positive again in June. He was much sicker the second time, with pneumonia that required hospitalisation and oxygen treatment.

The findings have not yet been published or reviewed by other scientists, but were posted on a research site.

Obese people more likely to die from COVID-19: Study (3:48)

Scientists at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine and the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory said they were able to show through sophisticated genetic testing that the virus associated with each instance of the Reno man’s infection represented genetically different strains.

The case “should cement in our minds that there’s no such thing … as invulnerability” to the virus, even if you’ve already had it, said Mark Pandori, director of the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory.

“One can get sick again and that illness can be quite severe.”

01:05 GMT – Most US states reject Trump administration’s new testing guidance

A majority of states in the United States have rejected new guidance on COVID-19 testing from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Reuters news agency reported, in a move public health experts said showed deepening distrust of the handling of the pandemic by the administration of US President Donald Trump. 

At least 33 states continue to recommend testing people who have been exposed to COVID-19 and have no symptoms, spurning guidance published by the CDC this week that said testing may be unnecessary.

Reuters said 16 states did not immediately respond to requests for comment and North Dakota said it had not made a decision.

Michael Mina, assistant professor of epidemiology at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, told the agency: “This is states almost all-out rebelling against the new guidelines.”

00:49 GMT – Rio de Janeiro governor suspended over alleged COVID-19 graft

A Brazilian court temporarily removed Wilson Witzel, the governor of Rio de Janeiro, from office over alleged graft in the purchase of medical supplies and services.

In a statement to reporters, the governor called his 180-day suspension by a federal body a politically-motivated “circus” led by a public prosecutor with ties to President Jair Bolsonaro’s family, and based on false testimony by his former health secretary.

In conjunction with the court decision, federal police arrested nine people and carried out 83 raids on associates of Witzel on Friday as part of their graft investigation, prosecutors said.

Rio de Janeiro Governor Wilson Witzel gestures as he speaks to the media at Laranjeiras Palace in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil [Pilar Olivares/ Reuters]

00:10 – Canada extends ban on most foreign travellers

Canada is extending restrictions on travellers arriving in the country for another month to help combat the spread of COVID-19, Public Safety Minister Bill Blair announced on Twitter.

Canadian citizens and permanent residents returning from abroad will continue to be subject to strict quarantine measures, he added.

Arrivals in Canada are required to undergo a 14-day quarantine period.


Hello and welcome to Al Jazeera’s continuing coverage of the coronavirus pandemic. I’m Zaheena Rasheed in Male, Maldives. 

For all the key developments from yesterday, August 28, go here.





Source – www.aljazeera.com

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Bitcoin: After weekend dip, chart watchers share crypto clues | Banks News

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Bitcoin has yet to recover from its unexplained weekend swoon, and now the investing public is on edge about the notoriously volatile token’s next move. Enter the chart watchers.

Noting that “a chart is a chart is a chart,” Tallbacken Capital Advisors’s Michael Purves sent a note Wednesday with a technical analysis of the coin’s trading patterns. Bitcoin’s recent highs weren’t confirmed by its relative strength index, among other things, and its upward momentum is fading, he said.

“From purely a technical perspective, the bullish case looks highly challenged here in the near term,” after its recent rally, wrote Purves, chief executive officer at the firm.

It’s another sign that Bitcoin has become too big for Wall Street to ignore. With more firms allowing customers to dabble in the asset and more institutional money tied to its performance, no wonder chart watchers are capitulating and now lending their expertise to the growing batch of analysis.

Earlier, JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s analysts also chimed in with their take. The last few times Nikolaos Panigirtzoglou witnessed such negative price action in Bitcoin, buyers returned in time to prevent deeper slumps. This time, the strategist is worried.

If the largest cryptocurrency isn’t able to break back above $60,000 soon, momentum signals will collapse, strategists led by Panigirtzoglou wrote in a note Tuesday. It’s likely traders including Commodity Trading Advisers (CTAs) and crypto funds were at least partly behind the buildup of long Bitcoin futures in recent weeks, as well as the unwind in past days, they said.

“Over the past few days Bitcoin futures markets experienced a steep liquidation in a similar fashion to the middle of last February, middle of last January or the end of last November,” the strategists said. “Momentum signals will naturally decay from here for several months, given their still elevated level.”

In those three previous instances, the overall flow impulse was strong enough to allow Bitcoin to quickly break out above the key thresholds, yielding further buildups in position by momentum traders, JPMorgan noted.

“Whether we see a repeat of those previous episodes in the current conjuncture remains to be seen,” the strategists said. The likelihood it will happen again seems lower because momentum decay seems more advanced and thus more difficult to reverse, they added. Flows into Bitcoin funds also appear weak, they said.

Bitcoin rose as high as $64,870 around the time of the Nasdaq listing of Coinbase Global Inc., but has retreated back to $55,000. The cryptocurrency is still up about 90% year-to-date.

The coin, down five of the last six sessions, is struggling to overtake its 50-day moving average around $56,819. For many chartists, that’s a bearish indicator since it tends to determine price momentum trends. Should Bitcoin be unable to breach its short-term trend line, it could move lower and test the $50,000 level, about a 10% decline from where it’s currently trading. The next area of support would be its 100-day moving average around $49,212. That would signify a 11% retreat from Wednesday’s trading levels.

Tallbacken’s Purves, who says the coin’s 2017 breakout and subsequent decline is a useful case study, also points Bitcoin’s daily MACD signal — or the moving average convergence divergence gauge — which has turned bearish in the intermediate-term. And its performance is still correlated to Cathie Wood’s uber-popular ARK Innovation ETF.

“Trading Bitcoin on the bullish side right now does not appear to have favorable risk-reward and if you have made profits, it seems like a good time to go to the sidelines for now,” Purves wrote.

To be sure, he said, it’s difficult to conclude how much further it could decline. Key to the issue will be how strongly institutional buyers step in. “While upside momentum is clearly looking challenged here, it is inconclusive how much downside risk remains,” he wrote in a note. “It is entirely possible that Bitcoin could simply consolidate in a range for some time.”

Bitcoin fell as much as 4.3% Wednesday to $54,341 before recouping some losses. Smaller and alternative coins that had run up in recent days also suffered declines Wednesday, with Dogecoin — the poster-child for crypto risk-taking — declining roughly 15% to trade around 31 cents. That’s down from a high of 42 cents the day prior, according to CoinMarketCap.com.



Source – www.aljazeera.com

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Pakistan: Several killed in explosion at Quetta hotel | Pakistan News

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Blast in parking area of Serena Hotel also wounded nine people, with some in critical condition, police say.

At least three people have been killed and nine others wounded in a powerful explosion in the parking area of an upscale hotel in the southwestern Pakistani city of Quetta, according to authorities.

Police said rescuers were transporting the victims of Wednesday’s blast at Serena Hotel to nearby hospitals. Footage on local news channels showed cars in flames.

Security forces rushed to the hotel and no one was allowed to approach the site of the explosion. Police said they had opened an investigation.

“Our officers are working to determine whether it was a bomb and what type of device it could be,” police official Nasir Malik told Reuters news agency.

According to senior police official Azhar Akram, some of the wounded were listed in critical condition. They were brought to Quetta’s main hospital.

No other information was immediately available.



Source – www.aljazeera.com

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Pay your mother: Oligarch’s son ordered to shell out $100M in UK | Russia News

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Temur Akhmedov did ‘all he could’ to stop his mother from getting a $627m divorce payout, a United Kingdom judge said.

The son at the center of the U.K.’s largest divorce lost a London court ruling over his role in hiding assets from his mother with a judge calling him “a dishonest individual who will do anything to assist his father.”

Temur Akhmedov worked with his billionaire father, Farkhad Akhmedov, to do “all he could” to stop his mother from obtaining a 450 million-pound ($627 million) court-approved divorce payout, Judge Gwynneth Knowles said in a ruling Wednesday. The judge ruled Temur should pay his mother more than $100 million.

The trial attracted scrutiny after Temur revealed he’d lost more than $50 million day trading while a college student. He’d argued that far from hiding his father’s money from his mother, he’d instead lost some of it with bad trades.

“Temur has learned well from his father’s past conduct and has done and said all he could to prevent his mother receiving a penny of the matrimonial assets,” the judge said.

Temur’s mother, Tatiana Akhmedova, wants the keys to a luxury apartment overlooking London’s Hyde Park in a bid to recover some of the cash.

Azerbaijan-born Farkhad made much of his wealth from the sale of his stake in a Russian gas producer in November 2012 for $1.4 billion. But the oligarch has refused to make any divorce payments, leaving Tatiana, backed by litigation funder Burford Capital Ltd., to pursue cases in at least six countries.

“Entirely predictably, given its original wrong and misguided judgment, the London court has ruled in favor of visiting ‘the sins’ of the father on an innocent and loyal son,” Farkhad said in a statement.

The fight has led to Tatiana’s so-far unsuccessful legal attempts to seize a 115-meter (377-foot) superyacht once owned by Roman Abramovich that is currently in Dubai, and a collection of modern art worth more than $140 million in a secure storage facility in Liechtenstein known as the “Treasure House.”

Farkhad moved to Russia after the initial divorce order in 2016. But by getting an English ruling against Temur, a U.K. resident, it’ll be easier for his mother to obtain his local assets.

At the trial last year, Temur said his father made his own decisions. He said his mother’s choice to draw him into the litigation has been “tremendously upsetting and in many ways quite frightening.”

He said in a statement that while he disagreed with the ruling, “he would consider it a price worth paying for should it lead to a reasonable settlement between the parents he both loves.”

Tatiana said during the trial that her relationship with her eldest son “is now very strained.” She said she felt she had no choice but to sue him.

“I always knew that my strength would prevail through the smoke and mirrors as presented by Farkhad and his circus of illusionists,” Tatiana said in a statement after the ruling.

Temur said at the trial that he’d had some initial success trading stocks, only to hit a losing streak while studying at the London School of Economics. When he tried to make back the money, “convinced this loss was just bad luck,” he increased his risk exposure and lost everything, he explained in court.

The judge rejected Temur’s explanation that his mother knew about his trading, saying the transfer of millions of dollars from his father’s account was in fact designed to put it out of her reach. That he’d then racked up losses was beside the point, she said.

“All happy families are alike, each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way,” Knowles said in her judgment. “With apologies to Tolstoy, the Akhmedov family is one of the unhappiest ever to have appeared in my courtroom.”



Source – www.aljazeera.com

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