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India, China to work towards ‘complete disengagement’ of troops | India News

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India and China have agreed to resolve all outstanding problems in an “expeditious manner” and in accordance with the existing protocols, New Delhi said on Thursday after border talks between the two Asian giants.

“The two sides will continue to sincerely work towards complete disengagement of the troops along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) in the Western Sector,” India’s foreign ministry said in a statement.

The two countries have deployed thousands of troops across their 3,500km (2,200-mile) disputed frontier since late April after Chinese troops entered into territories that New Delhi claims its own. China denies it has transgressed the LAC – the de facto border between the two countries.

Tensions have flared since June 15, when at least 20 Indian soldiers were killed in Galwan Valley located in Indian-administered Ladakh (in the Western sector) in the deadliest violence in more than 40 years.

In the meeting of the India-China Working Mechanism for Consultation and Coordination (WMCC) the officials agreed on the “restoration of peace and tranquillity” in the border areas.

‘Candid exchange of views’

“The two sides had a candid and in-depth exchange of views on the existing situation in border areas,” said spokesman Anurag Srivastava in a statement.

A satellite image taken over Galwan Valley in Ladakh parts of which are contested with China [Planet Labs Inc via Reuters]

“They reaffirmed that in accordance with the agreements reached between the two Foreign Ministers and the two Special Representatives, the two sides will continue to sincerely work towards complete disengagement of the troops along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) in the Western Sector,” said the statement.

MEA’s Srivastava last week said New Delhi was looking forward to work jointly for complete disengagement of troops at the LAC.

The Chinese embassy in New Delhi in a statement said the two sides agreed to “cool down the border situation” and “jointly maintain peace and tranquility” at the contested border.

On August 11, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said maintaining bilateral ties with New Delhi was his country’s priority.

“For the China-India relationship, the two sides should jointly safeguard peace and security in the border areas and maintain a steady and sound development of bilateral ties,” Zhao was quoted as saying by India’s PTI news service.

Long-standing border issues

The two Asian rivals have already held about a dozen rounds of talks, including at the military level, to soothe tension, but analysts say the meetings so far have not borne fruit as China has refused to pull back its troops to the pre-April position and cut down on border reinforcement. Analysts in India say the Chinese continues to occupy border areas perceived by India as its own territory.

The two countries have long-standing border issues, with Beijing claiming territory in India’s northeast, while New Delhi accuses Beijing of occupying its territory in the Aksai Chin plateau in the Himalayas, including part of the Ladakh region.

Experts say India’s stripping of part of the disputed Kashmir region – which lies between India, Pakistan and China – of its autonomy a year ago exacerbated existing tensions with China and culminated in the deadliest clash between the Asian giants in more 45 years.

China saw this as a unilateral move that threatened its territorial sovereignty and condemned it at the United Nations.

In August 2019, New Delhi stripped Indian-administered Kashmir of its statehood, demoting it to a federal territory, and clamped down on dissent.

The region’s decades-old semi-autonomy, which protected jobs and land from outsiders, was also scrapped.

New Delhi also carved out Ladakh as a separate federal territory.



Source – www.aljazeera.com

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10 Myanmar police killed in attack by ethnic armies: Reports | Conflict News

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Fighters from an alliance of rebel groups reportedly attack a police station in a new escalation after the military coup.

An alliance of ethnic armies in Myanmar that has opposed the general’s crackdown on anti-coup protests attacked a police station in the east on Saturday and killed at least 10 policemen, local media said.

The police station at Naungmon in Shan state was attacked early in the morning by fighters from an alliance that includes the Arakan Army, the Ta’ang National Liberation Army, and the Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army, media reported.

Shan News said at least 10 policemen were killed, while the Shwe Phee Myay news outlet put the death toll at 14.

A spokesman for the military did not return calls asking for comment.

Al Jazeera’s Tony Cheng, reporting from neighbouring Thailand, noted the ethnic armies are some of the oldest in the world, having battled central government forces for decades.

“Since the coup, there has been a lot of talk about armed groups operating together but we have not actually seen it before. Today it’s claimed three acted together, joined forces, attacked this outpost manned by Myanmar police, killing a number of policemen,” said Cheng, adding the assault occurred over two hours early on Saturday.

More than 600 people have been killed by the military in the crackdown on protests against the February 1 coup, according to a monitoring group. As violence has escalated, about a dozen armed groups have condemned the coup-makers as illegitimate and pledged to stand with the protesters.

Civilian lawmakers, most of whom are in hiding after their removal, have announced plans to form a “national unity government” – with key roles for ethnic leaders – and are holding online talks about joint resistance to the generals.

Dozens of bodies

Meanwhile, reports from Myanmar say dozens of people may have been killed in a military assault on anti-coup protesters in the city of Bago. About 60 people may have died in the clashes in the city, about 60km (32 miles) northeast of Yangon, according to Radio Free Asia citing witnesses.

News site Myanmar Now cited a protest leader as saying dozens of bodies had been brought inside a pagoda compound where the military was based. Witnesses cited by both media outlets reported hours of gunfire that started early on Friday.

Protests against the February coup continued on Saturday in Yangon, Mandalay, Bagan, Sagaing, Myeik and many other cities.

The military crackdown has also included reports of protesters being tortured in detention and harsh sentences.

The military issued death sentences on 19 people from Yangon’s North Okkalapa township on Friday. They were charged with beating an army captain, according to Radio Free Asia.

The military coup dismissed the elected government led by Aung San Suu Kyi, who is currently under house arrest.



Source – www.aljazeera.com

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Egypt unearth 3,000-year-old lost city

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A new archaeological discovery is seen in Luxor, Egypt, in this undated handout photo. (Zahi Hawass Center for Egyptology and High Council of Antiquities Joint Mission/Handout via Reuters)

A new archaeological discovery is seen in Luxor, Egypt, in this undated handout photo. (Zahi Hawass Center for Egyptology and High Council of Antiquities Joint Mission/Handout via Reuters)

Egyptian archeologists have unearthed a 3,000-year-old lost city, complete with mud-brick houses, artifacts, and tools from pharaonic times.


Noted archeologist Zahi Hawass said an Egyptian mission discovered the mortuary city in the southern province of Luxor. It dates back to what is considered a golden era of ancient Egypt, the period under King Amenhotep III of the 18th dynasty.

“Many foreign missions searched for this city and never found it,” Hawass said in a statement Thursday. The city, built on the western bank of the Nile River, was once the largest administrative and industrial settlement of the pharaonic empire, he added.

Last year, archeologists started excavating in the area, searching for the mortuary temple of King Tutankhamun. However, within weeks, the statement said, archeologists found mud bricks formations that eventually turned out to be a well-preserved large city. City walls, and even rooms filled with utensils used in daily life are said to be present.

“The archaeological layers have laid untouched for thousands of years, left by the ancient residents as if it were yesterday,” the press release said.

The newly unearthed city is located between the temple of King Rameses III and the colossi of Amenhotep III on the west bank of the Nile in Luxor. The city continued to be used by Amenhotep III’s grandson Tutankhamun, and then his successor King Ay.

Betsy Brian, professor of Egyptology at John Hopkins University, said the discovery of the lost city was the most important archeological find since the tomb of Tutankhamun.

King Tut became a household name and helped renew interest in ancient Egypt when his tomb in the Valley of the Kings was discovered nearly fully intact in 1922.

Archeologists have also found clay caps of wine vessels, rings, scarabs, coloured pottery, and spinning and weaving tools. Some mud bricks bear the seal of King Amenhotep III’s cartouche, or name insignia. 







Source – observer.ug

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Saudi Arabia executes 3 soldiers for ‘cooperating with enemy’ | Saudi Arabia News

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The defence ministry says soldiers were sentenced to death by a specialist court after a fair trial.

Saudi Arabia has executed three soldiers convicted of “high treason” and “cooperating with the enemy”, with a statement from the kingdom’s defence ministry saying the trio was sentenced to death by a specialist court after a fair trial.

The state-run Saudi Press Agency identified the men as soldiers working in the defence ministry. It did not elaborate on how the men aided the kingdom’s enemies.

The ministry did not name the “enemy” either but the executions on Saturday were carried out in the southern province bordering Yemen where Saudi Arabia has been at war for more than six years against the Iran-backed Houthi fighters.

Saudi Arabia has come under increasing global scrutiny over its human rights record since the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in 2018 at the kingdom’s Istanbul consulate and the detention of women’s rights activists.

Rights groups, including Amnesty International, have called on Riyadh to stop the use of the death penalty, citing allegations of torture and unfair trials.

Saudi Arabia denies the accusations.

According to Amnesty figures, Saudi Arabia carried out the world’s third-highest number of executions in 2019.



Source – www.aljazeera.com

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